Archive | January, 2021

Not so happy now

29 Jan

 

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Regent’s Park, London

So what went wrong?  The official UK happiness statistics for 2019/20 are showing the first significant drop in our levels of well-being since the surveys began in 2011. ‘In the year ending March 2020, average ratings of life satisfaction, happiness and anxiety all deteriorated,’ says the Office for National Statistics. ‘This is the first time since we started measuring them that these three measures have significantly worsened when compared with the year before.’

Average anxiety ratings went up by 6.3%, from 2.87 to 3.05 (out of 10). This is the largest annual increase since 2011; anxiety has now reached its highest-ever level. The ratings for happiness in the UK fell by 1.1% over the year. And life-satisfaction fell as well, although on the same trajectory as during the previous year. The average score under the fourth measure of well-being, our sense that the things done in life are worthwhile, remained unchanged. ‘There was no sharp pre-lockdown decline in life satisfaction, and feelings that the things done in life are worthwhile remained stable,’ concludes the ONS.

Even so, it’s not looking good, and the explanation isn’t completely obvious. ‘Pre-lockdown’ is a key term here. The survey only goes up to March 31st 2020, and at that point we were little more than a week into our first experience of ‘stay at home if you possibly can’. However, as the ONS reminds us, by the start of 2020 there were already ‘increasing concerns about the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and lockdown in the UK, with the World Health Organization (WHO) declaring a public health emergency of international concern by the end of January 2020.’ These issues may have contributed to the steep increase in anxiety and the reduction in happiness during the first quarter of 2020.

Anything else? ‘It’s Brexit, you moron,’ I hear some of you cry. ‘Not to mention our crappy government.’ Here we need to remind ourselves that in December 2019 Boris Johnson and his Brexiteers had won a resounding victory in the UK General Election. So quite a lot of people should have been extremely happy. Perhaps the ones who voted for other parties were so excessively pissed off that their plummeting spirits counteracted the joy of the Tory supporters. And let’s not forget that Johnson and his cronies won only 43.6% of the vote in the election (as is nearly always the case, the new government hadn’t acquired an overall majority among the voters). So there were quite a few folk around who would have been both devastated and pretty frightened about the future.

Moreover, the Tory triumph was followed almost immediately by the COVID crisis. There wasn’t a great deal of time for elation.  And in the period leading up to the General Election the outcome of the Brexit fracas had remained very uncertain. The UK population was – and remains – extremely divided over the issue. No wonder the quarterly figures show that our spirits were already flagging by the end of September 2019.

The ONS also suggests that part of the explanation may lie in financial difficulties.  During most of 2019/20 unemployment continued to fall. But people were probably beginning to worry about the future prospects for the economy: we’d had the dramatic collapse of businesses like Debenhams; and seemingly solid companies such as Boots and Marks and Spencer were already reporting falls in their profits.

Now, of course, the ONS is busy gathering in the figures for April 2020 to March 2021. Our current ‘happiness year’ ends in only two months’ time. Statistically speaking, at any rate, it seems certain that for the time being  things can only get worse.

For the 2019/20 figures, go to:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/wellbeing/bulletins/measuringnationalwellbeing/april2019tomarch2020